Written by Will Parchman

The Brad Friedel era for the U19 MNT arrived with more pomp than one might expect for an age group that didn’t exist in the U.S. YNT chain just a few months ago. This was Friedel, after all, the man who’d played 400,000 matches in the EPL, gotten his coaching badges while ensconced in England and learned from the Tottenham Hotspur academy that’s produced… a lot of good players.

Well, the U19s’ first official tournament… well… it did not go well.

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Written by Will Parchman

pearce

Google ‘Stuart Pearce psycho.’

I’ll wait.

….

Sufficiently terrified yet?

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Written by Will Parchman

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This week we’ve been publishing a three-part, in-depth interview with new U19 coach Brad Friedel (you can find part one here and part two here). Now, finally, we come to the end.

The third part of this chat is probably the most prosaic. The Messi question found its way in (OH NO), in addition to concerns about Hispanic inclusion in U.S. Soccer, playing style, our reliance on English soccer coaches and more.

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Written by Will Parchman

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After beginning our serialized chat with Brad Friedel on Wednesday, we continue with a new raft of topics today. From performance analysis to coaching to grassroots soccer, we’re navigating the waters again today.

Since Friedel spoke at considerable length, I’ve broken this into three parts to give each its due, which we’ll run in three installments over the next three days. What follows is the second part. Here’s the first.

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Written by Will Parchman

_64588634_bradfriedelone

Not long ago, longtime U.S. national team goalkeeping mainstay Brad Friedel accepted the job as the first U19 MNT coach in U.S. system history. In an attempt to bridge the gap between the U18s and the U20s, Friedel’s U19s are an echoing result from systems run by much of the rest of the world. As of last year, the U.S. was one of the few developed soccer nations without a U19 side.

Friedel recently sat down to chat at length about that role, the state of soccer in the U.S., claims that U.S. Soccer and MLS are at odds and much, much more.

Since Friedel spoke at considerable length, I’ve broken this into three parts to give each its due, which we’ll run in three installments over the next three days. What follows is the first part.

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Written by Will Parchman

_64588634_bradfriedelone

On Jan. 22, 2011, Aston Villa secured an unlikely 1-0 win over Manchester City, which at the time was still coming to grips with its new vaults of cash. Villa was fighting to stave off relegation while City was attempting to push into position to challenge for the title.

The match was notable in particular because of the man between the posts for Aston Villa. Brad Friedel was just four months shy of his 40th birthday, and even then, four years ago, questions about his retirement swirled. But at least on this day, Friedel acrobatically silenced them. The Ohio native was clearly breaking down as a player, but the glint of his world class ability burned through the fog. At one point he turned away a tricky header from Vincent Kompany, as if to make a statement that his career was much farther from its conclusion than his hairline would lead you to believe.

But there was more to it than that, more boiling underneath the surface than anyone in the stands that day understood. Two days before the match, an English judge declared Friedel bankrupt. He owed more than $8 million on a failed academy venture in his home state called Premier Soccer Academies. Despite earning $40,000/week in wages, one bad venture forced arguably the finest American goalkeeper to ever live into the depths of financial reorganization.

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Written by Will Parchman

friedel

Tim Howard opened the ground beneath his relationship with Brad Friedel this week. In his new book, Howard claimed Friedel refused to sign a work permit statement on his behalf when Howard joined Manchester United in 2003. Friedel responded by saying that the letter was “full of exaggerations,” so he made some edits, signed and then resubmitted the article. It was not used.

So what did Howard’s original statement say? The 91st Minute has obtained that letter. For the first time, an exclusive on the supposedly exaggerative missive Friedel refused to sign.

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Written by Will Parchman

Brad Friedel is famous for his AmerEnglish accent. Famously, he once read a Tweet by our own Travis Clark on the very subject. It’s not American. It’s not British. It’s somewhere in between.

When Tim Howard announced last week that he was stepping aside from international soccer for a year to recharge, Brad Guzan quietly slid into the No. 1 spot. That video there was released in advance of FIFA 15’s release later this month, and the game features, for the first time, every Premier League stadium. It also features more player faces, and that brief interview with Guzan proves that his accent is getting pretty damn Friedelian. Guzan is only 29. That accent will only metastasize.

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Written by The 91st

Apparently the new thing to do in sports/entertainment circles is to sit a person down, and have him/her read the snarky or mean things that are banded about on social media.

Former U.S. international and current Tottenham goalkeeper Brad Friedel is the latest Premier League star to be subjected to it, sifting through an assortment of comments about his age, accent and lack of hair.

A certain TDS writer has the dubious honor of having a Tweet read aloud as well.

HT SI.com

 

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Written by Administrator


Get to know new Manchester United midfielder Ashley Young, who has played with four US internationals in his young career, and has now joined the club he calls the biggest in the world. For comprehensive coverage of Manchester United’s US tour.

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